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Gauss) Andy Klein The link below explains how we compute failure rates with a bit more detail. Next //Most Popular Articles 32 Hidden Chrome Features That Will Make Your Life Easier How to Fix the Most Annoying Things in Windows 10 The Creepy World of Abandoned Video Games Potential problems BackBlaze’s methods haven’t been without controversy either. I voiced my dislike of Seagates, but he grinned and said, "Seagates are good as long as you thrash them." His opinion was that you don't want Seagates in systems that this content

Modern HDDs are generally very good these days. I'm pretty sure these are all HDD, platter drives. About Us Contact Us Digital Edition Customer Service Gift Subscription Ad Choices Newsletters Privacy Policy RSS Terms of Service Agreement E-commerce Affiliate Relationships PCWorld CATEGORIES Business Laptops Mobile PC Hardware Printers The Deathstars were all IBM drives, specifically, the 75GXP.2 Robert I had a Hitachi Deskstar shortly after they purchased the division from IBM and it died of the click of death

Most Reliable Hard Drive 2016

My case is off to the side in an isolated, but well ventilated area. The HGST drives are nice, but bang for the buck is what I look for. The formula we use is (100*drive-failures)/(drive-hours/24/365) Lars Viklund What is your strategy when it comes to keeping the firmware of your disks up to date? I still have 200GB drives running in multiple machines with zero failures, I also still have a few 250GB drives for test use, none that worked properly more than 6 months

I think here is not the right placet to Diskussion :-) 2005OEFArmy . Happy customer here. Mac or PC. Hgst External Hard Drive Both have an issue where I hear them power on and off endlessly "click whirrrr, click, whirrr" but not a click like the click-of-death, just one indicating the drive shutting off.

The operating environment plays a roll too, specifically temperature. My interpretation is that they put as many 6TB drives as they could without exceeding the maximum power capacity, which would optimize both metrics. Not sure how this adds up to the failure rate posted here.. https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-reliability-stats-q1-2016/ They have an elaborate testing lab and do extremely thorough tests.

When you receive a replacement drive it is typically a refurbished drive, and the manufacture date can be significantly earlier. Best Internal Hard Drives EssJ If they filled the pod with 6TB exclusively and the power draw exceeded capacity, then that would not be an optimal configuration as the pod would be dead. reading all the text) to see if I could analyze the info, but, again, not enough info is there for me to make heads or tails of it. Can you provide the Cumulative hard drive reliability rates in a downloadable spreadsheet so we may more easily sort them in various ways to help make drive purchasing decisions?

Hgst Hard Drive

Seagate drives that they are primarily purchasing now. https://www.cnet.com/products/hitachi-external-hard-drive/review/ CrashPlan on the other hand kept all my data I had on external hard drives I haven't connected in over a year. Most Reliable Hard Drive 2016 When asked why, their response was they feel "this specification is not necessary for consumer HDD's". Most Reliable External Hard Drive 2016 Hitachi does not fare well.http://www.behardware.com/articles/810-6/components-returns-rates.html fzabkarAug 21, 2011, 11:05 AM Hitachi was the winner in this hard drive reliability survey:http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/hdd-reliability-storelab,2681-2.html tomm174Aug 13, 2012, 12:32 AM jsanthara said: Here's my two cents,

During Q1, some of the drive model had no failures, hence the 0% failure rate for them. http://splodgy.org/hard-drive/hitachi-320gb-pata-drive.php There are some exceptions. Terry Fundak I'm not sure why you rate CrashPlan so low. Drive failures from the other manufacturers appear to be less predictable via SMART stats. 6TB Hard Drives We continued to add 6TB drives over the course of 2015, bringing the total Most Reliable Hard Drive Brand

EssJ Unless you buy and use 16,000 drives a year as a consultant, I'll put more credence in their hard data versus your anecdotal experience. Even TWC is having the same problems, the fact is that once another provider moves to your area TWC will lose most if not all of its cliental and the same My precious memories I have trusted to such a product and company. have a peek at these guys Braun While I think you have a large enough population of HGST and Seagate drives (tens of thousands) to draw some valid conclusions regarding reliability, I'm a bit concerned that you

Andy Klein Even better answer +1 mickrussom Do the manufacturers try and deny warranty claims because you are using a "non-24-hours" desktop drive in a server-storage role. Seagate Vs Western Digital External Hard Drive Sometimes we can still buy some new ones in the channel, but they are hard to find. We find it's one of the most important ones in a system to keep fresh and to bully vendors about.

We'll be uploading the Q4 2015 data in the next few days then you will be able to download the data so you can reproduce our results or you can dig

I had an 80 GB Maxtor fail plenty of years ago, so I decided to stay away from WD. Their average age is nearly 5 years (58.6 months) and their cumulative failure rate is a meager 1.55%. Now I'm looking for a reliable external HDD that can keep my data for years [it will be mostly unused, seems more reliable than DVDs/BluRays]. Most Reliable Portable Hard Drive All of your failure rates are much higher than the actual numbers you show are.

We don’t list drive models in this chart of which we have less than 45 drives. However, I can't help but be a bit skeptical simply because the Seagate drives that they are using are 5400 RPM consumer drives, most of which are out of external enclosures. Wear and tear matters and a HDD that spins at a lower number or RPMs may enjoy a longer life. check my blog The formula we use is (100*drive-failures)/(drive-hours/24/365) Kevin Samuel Coleman There's gotta be a better name than failure rate, because many people reading this will assume that 9% of Seagate drives they

In the developed nations like Australia (where we live now), USA, etc have lost most of our factory creativity.